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Roses & Fruit

15 May

First of all l have a small confession to make. Strictly speaking these are not my roses. I bought them in England from David Austin, brought them back to France, planted them, fed, watered and pruned them BUT not in my garden! They are in a client’s garden who just happens to have a love of English roses, especially David Austin, oh and only in Pink, so who am l to argue. They live in Switzerland and only visit a couple of times a year but, fortunately for her, had timed one of her visits the other week so was able to enjoy the first of the blooms.

Constance Spry

The first one here is Constance Spry, it has a strong myrrh fragrance, almost like the smell of a bar of Camay soap of dream like quality. It can grow 12ft or more as a climber. A full flowered rose. Great as a cut flower.

Gertrude Jekyll

Next up is my all time favourite, and the nation’s as well by all accounts, Gertrude Jekyll. This has the most amazing fragrance. I wish we had smellinet and l could share it with you! David Austin describes it as having ‘the quintessential old rose fragrance’. I fully agree. I could get high off this fragrance! A real ‘must have’ in any garden, but beware, this lady is quite prickly.

Paul's Himalyan Musk

Paul's Himalyan Musk

Another rose l planted was in the corner of their house as it has a reputation of being quite a rampant, vigorous rambler, Paul’s Himalayan Musk. This boy can reach up to 30ft and is ideal for a pergola or to cover a building. This, too, has a great fragrance. The flowers are quite delicate and only flower once but wow, what a display.

James Galway

I also planted two ‘James Galway’ either side of their front door. These have done really well and make a wonderful entrance. the flowers are full and, again, have a beautiful old rose fragrance. Some people say it is a shame roses cannot be in flower all summer long but l think this is what makes them so special. For most of them to be in flower in the months of May and June, this is what makes an English Summer.

In this garden they are lucky enough to have several fruit trees. My favourite is the Quince so l was really pleased to see the fruit had set on the tree. Nothing can stop us now from having a good crop come September and October. A late frost got last year’s blossom and there wasn’t a single fruit to be had. It should be a good year for all fruit, both in the garden and the hedgerow. Can’t wait!

Quince

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8 Comments

Posted by on May 15, 2011 in Flowers, May, The garden

 

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8 responses to “Roses & Fruit

  1. Toffeeapple

    May 16, 2011 at 16:37

    What a glorious posting, I can almost smell the perfume from here. I am hoping to increase my Roses this year and am looking forward to searching the Austin catalogue.

     
    • trevorhunt

      May 16, 2011 at 21:27

      Hi Toffeeapple, Thank you. The David Austin catalogue is beautiful. I am like a boy in a sweet shop when l browse through that and especially when l am spending other people’s money! Ha ha. Do you have a blog?

       
  2. Janet/Plantaliscious

    May 16, 2011 at 16:38

    They really do make a spectacular show. And all the best ladies are prickly…

     
  3. trevorhunt

    May 16, 2011 at 21:28

    Yes, Janet, you are probably right. It’s just that it has taken me most of my life to realize that!

     
  4. Toffeeapple

    May 18, 2011 at 14:34

    No Trevor, I don’t blog but I do read an awful lot of them which is how I found yours, via Wartime Housewife.

     
    • trevorhunt

      May 18, 2011 at 16:32

      Ok, thanks. Hope you continue to find this of interest!

       
  5. Thud

    May 25, 2011 at 23:35

    I’m working on restoring an old Gothic house and on the odd spare occasion I’m working on grounds…this site will be a great help.

     
    • trevorhunt

      May 26, 2011 at 11:01

      Thanks Thud. I have taken a look at your site and the work you are doing looks great. I could have done with you a few years ago when l built this timber-framed extension on our house! I hope you find this site useful.

       

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