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Tag Archives: broad beans

‘Cast not a clout till May be out’

How true! I don’t know about you but here we are still having log fires in the evenings and wrapping up in fleeces during the day! A friend of mine who lives in the south of France told me the other day that she had snow and power cuts and it was -1c! Its not as bad as that here but l have had enough of that northerly wind.

MAY-1stWEEK

2. Sow Runner Beans Outside.- In the south and midlands runner beans and dwarf beans may now be risked outside. By the time they are through the danger of severe frost will be fairly remote. It is still early to plant out those raised under glass, but they should be hardened off as much as possible.

4.Sow Beet and Sweetcorn.- Sow seakale beet and spinach beet in rows 18-in. apart. Put the seed in pinches at intervals of 9-in. Sweet corn seeds may be sown out of doors now in the south, but they may need cloche protection for a short time.

6. Keep Strawberries Clean.- When the flower stalks of strawberries appear, clean straw should be placed around the plants to keep the fruit clean. It must be put down carefully and the trusses placed over it. Special mats of straw can be purchased for the purpose.

7. Sow and Plant.- Sow and plant out lettuce. Sow more peas, and plant out tall peas raised inside. Finish planting potatoes. Thin parsnips and other seedlings. Prick out celery and celeriac. Sow scorzonera out of doors and radishes for succession. Hoe and keep down weeds.

Beanpoles

My beanpoles are in and l have planted some of my sweet peas to mingle with the beans as they all grow up the poles. In the middle of the poles are a catch crop of lettuce which l should be able to harvest before the peas and beans get too big.The cultivation of runner beans posed a serious problem during the war as there was a shortage of bamboos and long stakes prompting some people to actually steal them!

runner beans

I planted some runner beans, Lady Di, in my unheated greenhouse and they are doing really well. I saved the seeds from last years crop by leaving some beans on the plant and letting them dry off naturally. These then went into a sealed box in the fridge over winter.

celeriac

The celeriac is growing well and this weekend l will thin them out ready to grow on and plant out. I love celeriac roasted and one Christmas l went out into my garden to gather the vegetables ready for the dinner. When l came to pull, what looked like a beautiful row of celeriac, the plant literally broke off in my hand. On closer inspection l noticed that something, probably a mouse, had completely eaten away the inside of the plant leaving the outside shell untouched. Very clever!

First broad bean

Looking forward to lots more of these!

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Posted by on May 6, 2010 in May, The garden

 

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Beans in flower

March-4th Week

Mr Middleton says : If you are not successful with onions, grow shallots. They are an excellent substitute, and much easier to grow’.

1. Last chance for good digging.- Those who did not succeed in digging most of the garden before Christmas, and have since been held up by the bad weather, should press on without delay. Land dug early breaks down easily when forked and produces a good sowing tilth. It is much more difficult on land just turned over.

We haven’t had any significant rain now for some weeks with temperatures reaching 18c and the ground remains perfect for sowing seeds, transplanting lettuce and planting onions and potatoes. Of course, there is never enough time to do all of these things and the forecast for tomorrow is for heavy rain. I have covered a bed that l am using as my seed bed so that should remain in good condition. The other beds just need forking over and the dreaded weeds removing before they set seed.

The broad beans l sowed last Autumn are now in flower! They have proved just how hardy these plants can be with all the snow, frost and bitterly cold Northly winds we have had. Hopefully it won’t be long before l am picking the first of the new broad beans.

In the unheated greenhouse my peas are romping away and will need transplanting next week, along with more lettuce. Leeks are a bit slow but are now emerging. What with the clocks going forward this weekend the growing season is well and truly with us. How are you doing in your garden?

 
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Posted by on March 24, 2010 in March, The garden

 

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At last its March!

March-1st Week

Mr Middleton says: Soil is the basis of life. Take care of it.

Now that the season of sowing and planting is with us, and we are putting the final touches to the ground, we shall naturally be thinking of fertilizers, and these are going to prove something of a problem this year, owing to a shortage of some of the essential plant foods, so we shall have to be careful that we don’t get a badly balanced diet, or we may do more harm than good.

Mr Middleton goes on to talk about the benefits of using manure and compost in your garden rather than just chemical fertilizers. ‘ To use nothing but fertilizers in the garden year after year is rather like trying to live on tonics and tablets, which, although excellent in themselves, cannot take the place of solid food, or not for long at any rate.’ We have come a long way since the 1940’s with what we can use in the garden to feed our plants. Blood, fish and bone, Chicken pellets and many different organic substitutes can be used but Mr Middleton is quite correct, the soil needs bulky material which decays slowly and releases these foods gradually as they are needed.

So l have three compost bins that all need emptying and spreading on the beds along with a few bags of leaf mould. That’s a start. Then l will dig trenches out and start to fill them with kitchen scraps and the old straw bedding from the hens ready for the beans to go in but at the moment the soil is still far too wet and cold to do much. I had another quick look in the greenhouse and the lettuces l sowed last month are coming along quite well. I am up to my eyes in tiles, plaster, wood cladding, showers parts etc as l refit our bathroom downstairs. It seems to be taking forever and l can see, as usual, that it is going to be one huge rush to get everything done inside and, more importantly l feel, outside!

Early lettuce

Garlic

Autumn sown Broad Beans

Cerinthe & Beth

Big Bad Bertha (The Eggless Hen)

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2010 in March, The garden

 

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Here Comes The Rain Again…

I was just looking in the DOFV book to see what l might have been able to do this week; Mr Middleton advises;

Break down and lime soil,
Plant Onion sets,
Sow Parsnips, Broad Beans, Carrots etc,
Sow Early Peas, Sprouts and Summer Cabbage,

But as the rain hammers off the window, blown in by a near Hurricane force wind, l don’t think l will be doing any of that! I have sown more seeds in the unheated greenhouse and the early spuds are actually beginning to chit….just! The onion sets are ready to plant out as are the shallots and a few left over garlic cloves.
My hens hate this weather but are still providing us with 3 to 4 eggs a day so we won’t starve! The forecasters are telling us we are in for hell of a storm over the weekend up here in Brittany. At least we haven’t got 18 inches of snow like Scotland. I think a cup of tea is in order.
What will you be planting over the weekend if the weather is kind?

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2010 in February, The garden

 

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Digging…or lack of it!

January 3rd Week. Dig and clean up.

February 1st Week. How to use bad weather.

February is noted for its wetness. If it lives up to its reputation, work in the garden is at a standstill. Much can be done in the greenhouse, however. Frames and outdoor crops will need protection in severe weather. Parsnips can be lifted and stored in wet sand, thus clearing the soil for digging. Similarly leeks can be moved and heeled together in a frame or protected corner.

It is mid-February now and l have just been outside, wrapped up in fleece and hat, having a poke around at the veg beds. Apart from the fact that the bitterly cold N.E. wind numbs your face within seconds, the soil is too wet to do much with. I have marked out the beds and where l need to make new ones, the compost heap looks like it is going to provide me with some nice stuff but l am afraid its all put on hold until that sun comes out and warms things up a bit.

There are signs of life emerging. The Magnolia has some lovely buds on it and l am sure will provide us with a great display of flowers this year. The Hazel is laden with catkins. The broad beans l planted last year are looking great and are putting on some good growth. The same with the garlic that was planted last Autumn.

I have work to do in the house so the next week or so will be taken up with that. The old bathroom has to come out and a new one put in. Might as well do it while the weather is so bad and then when it is good l can be out there until it gets dark. The wind is howling around the cottage as l type this but with the wood burner lit its snug and warm!

February Page 1
 
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Posted by on February 13, 2010 in February, January, The garden

 

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